Disk Management

For most system configurations, you can use automatic assignment at stack or loop level; for smaller configurations, you can use automatic assignment at shelf level. The first automatic assignment occurs after 10 minutes. Use these guidelines for configuring automatic disk ownership at the stack or loop level: Always assign all disks on the same loop or stack to the same system. Always assign disks in the same multi-disk carrier to the same system. Use these guidelines for configuring automatic disk ownership at the shelf level: Always assign all disks on the same shelf to the same system. On storage systems that support two controllers but only a single stack, ifRead More

What is SVM DR?

    Storage Virtual Machines (SVMs) are essentially blades running Data ONTAP, more or less. They act as their own tenants in a cluster and could represent individual divisions, companies or test/prod environments. However, even with multiple SVMs, you still end up with a single point of failure – the storage system itself. If a meteor hit your datacenter, your cluster would be toast and your clients would be dead in the water, unless you planned for disaster recovery accordingly.   Steps: In this Post i am using two clusters 1. Cluster1 2. Cluster2 1. First check the intercluster role LIF is present in both the clusters.      Read More

Enabling Active Directory domain users to access the cluster

To enable Active Directory domain users to access the cluster, you must set up an authentication tunnel through a CIFS-enabled Vserver. You must also create cluster user accounts for the domain users. This functionality requires that CIFS is licensed on the cluster. 1. CIFS license is required. 2. Configure the cifs server for an existing vserver. 1. First create a security domain tunnel. 2. Create a cluster user, to access via ssh, http and ontapi. 3. Login with the new user, now authentication is done by the domain server. 4. Now create a role, to access the vserver vs1 only the paritcular volume called vol1. 5. Create a new userRead More

Storage Fail over

An HA pair is two storage systems (nodes) whose controllers are connected to each other directly. In this configuration, one node can take over its partner’s storage to provide continued data service if the partner goes down. You can configure the HA pair so that each node in the pair shares access to a common set of storage, subnets, and tape drives, or each node can own its own distinct set of storage. The controllers are connected to each other through an HA interconnect. This allows one node to serve data that resides on the disks of its failed partner node. Each node continually monitors its partner, mirroring the data for each other’s nonvolatileRead More

Flash Pool

A Flash Pool is the newest addition to the NetApp® Virtual Storage Tier. It is a technology that allows Flash technology in the form of solid-state disks (SSDs) and traditional hard disk drives (HDDs) to be combined to form a single Data ONTAP® aggregate. When SSD and HDD technologies are combined in a Data ONTAP aggregate, the NetApp storage system takes advantage of the latency and throughput benefits of SSD while maintaining the mass storage capacity of HDD. Requirements for using Flash Pools   The Flash Pool technology has some configuration requirements that you should be aware of before planning to use it in your storage architecture. Flash Pools cannot be used in theRead More